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CharlesXII I have a book question for you

You seem to read a lot of history books that have "an a...
Krampusnacht
  10/08/17
Will answer this later tonight, plane is about to take off.
ColdplayXII
  10/08/17
...
Krampusnacht
  10/09/17
Sorry for the delay. I suppose the fact a lot of my books...
ColdplayXII
  10/12/17
have you put any thought into what an optimal information/en...
the long sleep
  10/12/17
history UG classes taught me that any history shit worth rea...
name's ross
  10/12/17
Well, there's also primary sources, statistical overviews, e...
ColdplayXII
  10/12/17


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Date: October 8th, 2017 10:41 PM
Author: Krampusnacht

You seem to read a lot of history books that have "an argument" like the French Revolution one that you're reading now. Do you prefer books that "make an argument" or prefer books that just try to tell you what happened?



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3757985&forum_id=2#34397451)



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Date: October 8th, 2017 10:43 PM
Author: ColdplayXII (CharlesXII)

Will answer this later tonight, plane is about to take off.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3757985&forum_id=2#34397473)



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Date: October 9th, 2017 10:00 PM
Author: Krampusnacht



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3757985&forum_id=2#34404976)



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Date: October 12th, 2017 12:00 PM
Author: ColdplayXII (CharlesXII)

Sorry for the delay.

I suppose the fact a lot of my books have "arguments" is because, first, they tend to be written by academics or scholarship-minded amateurs, and second, I tend to read on topics where there is room for debate and interpretation.

Endless statements of fact tend to be pretty dull, and you can get that sort of thing from Wikipedia or primary sources anyway. If I'm going to bother with a whole book, I want somebody to go to the next level and try to interpret the overwhelming and often contradictory amount of information available.

For example, Napoleon Bonaparte was a good general and won many battles, and his opponents pretty much universally regarded him as one of the greatest soldiers to ever live. Yet he also made severe mistakes and was ultimately defeated. Sure, I could just read factual statements about what Napoleon did, but to me it's more interesting when an author tries to explain WHY Napoleon was so formidable, what his "secrets" were (if any), and why he went into decline and was ultimately defeated.

By the way, The Campaigns of Napoleon is a great book for that.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3757985&forum_id=2#34425000)



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Date: October 12th, 2017 12:36 PM
Author: the long sleep

have you put any thought into what an optimal information/entertainment diet for a modern person is?

for example, the other day you seemed upset that Beckerstead quit XO because he felt that inputs from XO wasn't improving his mental wellbeing

have you put any thought into what inputs improve your wellbeing? what inputs would improve the wellbeing of other particular people, or more broadly, society at large?

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3757985&forum_id=2#34425370)



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Date: October 12th, 2017 12:38 PM
Author: name's ross

history UG classes taught me that any history shit worth reading MAKES AN ARGUMENT

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3757985&forum_id=2#34425384)



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Date: October 12th, 2017 6:13 PM
Author: ColdplayXII (CharlesXII)

Well, there's also primary sources, statistical overviews, etc.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3757985&forum_id=2#34427869)